Does the Switch OLED Has 4K Support? Here Are The Differences

This July 6, Nintendo dropped without warning the announcement of the Nintendo Switch OLED, which like its name indicates, has a bigger, OLED screen compared to the normal version. Several differences are also worth noting ahead of the Switch OLED’s launch on October 8, 2021.

Will the Nintendo Switch OLED Add 4K Support?

Word is going around on social media that the Nintendo Switch OLED supports 4K, however, that’s not listed anywhere in the official specs so it’s definitely not true.

Overall, the Switch OLED has the same specs as a normal Switch, and is not an 4K enabling Super Switch or Switch Pro. The battery is the same most notably, and the resolutions are still the same: 1080P in docked mode, and 720P in portable mode.

While the OLED’s screen size is bigger, the console itself, with the Joy-Con attached, is still the same size as a normal Switch: 102 mm x 239 mm x 13.9 mm.

The Nintendo Switch OLED is definitely not a “Switch Pro”, and I personally highly doubt one should buy it if you already own a normal Switch or arguably a Switch Lite. I believe the OLED is mainly there to persuade those who have yet to own Nintendo’s console.

Ys IX: Monstrum Nox – Announcement Trailer – Nintendo Switch

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Ys IX: Monstrum Nox – Announcement Trailer – Nintendo Switch

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Switch OLED – Specs, hardware changes compared to the original console

The first change to note is the screen, which is now an OLED instead of LCD, and with 7 inches instead of 6,2 inches. It’s a slightly bigger screen, with a clearer and more vibrant image. The graphics will pop more basically.

Next, the OLED console is also a bit heavier. Joy-Cons detached, the original Switch weights around 297g, while Switch OLED is around 320g. Maybe you’ll feel a slight difference.

As for the internal storage, the OLED has 64GB of internal storage, twice the amount of the original Switch. A new adjustable stand was also added to the back, and the speakers on the console were also improved but no details were shared yet.

Lastly, the Nintendo Switch OLED adds an Ethernet port to the dock. With the original Switch, it’s pretty much mandatory to buy an USB to Ethernet adapter if you wanna play online games. Switch OLED gives you the Ethernet port from the get go.

That’s all the main differences. Again, this is definitely not a Super Switch, and I personally don’t believe there’s much point getting the OLED for $350 MSRP if you already own a normal Switch.

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